Module 3: Knee ACL injuries prevention

Erasmus+
“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein”

 

Anterior Cruciate Lingaments injuries in soccer – Prevention strategies 

 

Upon completion of this module the reader will be able to:

  • Understand basic anatomy and functional anatomy for the knee complex.
  • Understand the ACL Injury epidemiology
  • Understand the mechanisms for the Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries.
  • Determine common risk factors that can lead to the Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries.
  • Incorporate exercises in order apply a prevention strategy for the Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries.

Review the «Anatomy and Functional of the knee joint» topic and the «Injury prevention strategies» topic first. Read the description of the “Anterior Cruciate Ligaments injuries in soccer – Prevention strategies” and the corresponding presentation and then follow the proposed videos for some ideas of “ACL injury prevention exercises”. End the session with the “Bibliography and the additional learning materials” and assess your understanding with the “Anterior Cruciate Ligaments injuries in soccer” quiz.

Τhe proposed preventive strategies for knee injuries include four phases and they propose specific preventive exercises :

   Phase IMuscular conditioning to restore dysfunctional movement patterns that can impede performance

  1a. Inhibition: Inhibit through foam rolling the over-activate muscles: gastrocnemius & soleus, adductors, Tensor fasciae latae &    Iliotibial band, and the short head of the biceps femoris.

  1b.Muscle lengthen: Specific lengthening exercises with static or neuromuscular stretches for gastrocnemius & soleus,  adductors, Tensor fasciae latae & IT-band, and the short head of the biceps femoris

   Phase IIMuscular performance: Modifying strength and conditioning movements 

  Specific activation exercises through strengthening exercises or positional stabilization exercises for the anterior and posterior    tibialis, gluteus medius, and gluteus maximus. Core strength.

  Phase III:  Functional exercise: Building efficient movement patterns 

   Starting with proper athletic position, always warm up before playing, perform different Squats and Walking Lunges. Do       balance, agility-changing direction and jumping and landing exercises.

Erasmus+
“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein”

Anterior Cruciate Ligaments injuries in soccer – Prevention strategies

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common among young soccer athletes. Biomechanical studies have led to the development of training programs to improve neuromuscular control and reduce ACL injury rates as well as screening tools to identify athletes at higher risk for ACL injury (LaBella CR, 2014).

 ACL Injury epidemiology

ACL injuries are severe  injuries that, in more than half of all cases, associated with other concomitant Injuries to the knee joint such as collateral ligament tears and meniscus for cartilage lesions.  Although they received considerable attention  ACL  injuries account for less than 5% of all injuries in football (Walden 2011), and less than 1%   of all injuries in Elite football ((Walden 2011a).

In particular, Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures are among the most commonly studied injuries in orthopaedic research. The incidence of ACL ruptures is estimated to range from 30 to 78 per 100,000 person-years. After ACL reconstruction, 61% to 89% of athletes successfully return to sports, typically at 8 to 18 months after reconstruction, depending on the level of play. An analysis of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP) data from 1988 to 2004 showed that the highest rates of ACL ruptures occurred in women’s gymnastics, women’s basketball, women’s soccer, and men’s football. There has also been increasing interest in ACL prevention programs in handball, especially in women’s handball, in terms of maneuver techniques that predispose to ACL injuries.

Mechanisms of injury

The ACL is usually torn as a result of a quick deceleration, hyperextension or rotational injury that usually does not involve contact with another individual. This injury often occurs following a sudden change of direction. A person typically reports feeling a popping sensation in the knee.

 

 

ACL injury prevention exercises based on previous phases:

Phase I : Muscular conditioning to restore dysfunctional movement patterns that can impede performance

 

 

Phase ΙI : Muscular performance: Modifying strength and conditioning movements patterns

 

 

Phase III:  Functional exercise: Building efficient movement patterns 

 

 

Bibliography and the additional learning materials

 
  • First try to increase your joint flexibility using stretches or other techniques
  • Strengthen you muscles, especially the quadriceps, the hamstrings and secondary, all hip and ankle muscles
  • Perform balance exercises
  • Try to improve your technique in tackling, faking and landings
  • Always exercise in a pain-free range of motion. Exercises or parts of exercise that lead to pain should be avoided.

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Quiz module 3

Knee ACL injuries prevention

1 / 9

The knee joint is formed by:

2 / 9

The most basic knee joint movements are:

3 / 9

The anterior cruciate ligament resists:

4 / 9

Anterior cruciate ligament injuries account for:

5 / 9

The incidence of ACL ruptures is estimated to range from:

6 / 9

On average, an athlete with an ACL injury returns to play after:

7 / 9

A frequent injury mechanism of ACL injury is:

8 / 9

Phase 2 of ACL rehabilitation includes:

9 / 9

Phase 3 of ACL rehabilitation includes:

Your score is

The average score is 55%

0%

Erasmus+

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”